Mosques to visit after the Coronavirus lets up (Chapter I): Hassan II Mosque, Morocco

Morocco Hassan II Mosque in casablanca, Minaret
Hassan II Mosque in casablanca, Minaret Morocco © Artzzz | Dreamstime.com

Not all of us have been affected by the spread of the coronavirus, yet many of us still remain under quarantine that ranges in severity from city to city. Most of the world has reduced any tourist activity or business travel, leaving us to remain in our homes until better days. This however, is a great opportunity to plan out a visit to several exciting mosques around the world after the restrictions on travel will be lifted. 

In the upcoming sequence of marvellous mosques, we will indulge in a round-the-world trip, visiting some of the most beautiful, most architecturally impressive and most holy mosques ! We shall begin our journey with a tour of the fascinating and enigmatic continent of Africa.

If you are someone who is intrigued by the wonders of the African continent, but never until now had a chance to go, don’t miss this mosque when the opportunity presents itself! The Hassan Mosque is a palatial mosque on the coast of Morocco, boasting a 210 meter Minaret, as well as being the largest mosque in the whole continent.

The mosque itself was constructed relatively recently in historical perspective by order of King Hassan II, who wished to properly honour the late King Mohammed V. In 1980, he decided to build a grand mausoleum for King Mohammed V which would become a formidable landmark for the Moroccans, set out on the coastline of Casablanca.

After careful months of planning by the greatest artisans of the country, the mosque began its seven-year construction in 1986, according to the design laid out by French architect Michel Pinseau. The project turned out to be extremely financially heavy for Morocco, nevertheless, public funding and exterior support eventually amounted to helping raise an impressive 586 million euros, necessary for terminating the construction.

The Mosque was finally complete in August 1993 for the anniversary of Prophet Muhammed (SAW). Currently, the most impressive aspect of this mosque is indubitably the meticulous work put into each detail of its design. The architecture itself draws from many different origins, notably Moroccan roots, Islamic elements and Moorish styling.

The inside of the mosque is tiled with magnificent marble floors, white columns and decorated by opulent and plentiful mosaics. The wood carvings and paintings on the ceilings and walls are also nothing short of a masterpiece. Such fine craft can be explained by an impressive six thousands local artisans who worked tediously on the adornment of this mosque for five years, leading up to the luxurious inner design we have today.

The mosque itself spans 100m by 200 meters in size, planned to accommodate 25,000 people on the inside and a total of 105,000 worshippers if including exterior courtyards. The blossoming gardens are also decorated with 41 unique fountains and are a prime location for sharing a bite in family picnics!

The Hassan II mosque is a formidable sight to witness, even more so when you are inside. By visiting Allah’s temples when we travel, He will surely bestow onto us his blessings for dedicating the due time to his worship, as well as for expanding our knowledge of the Quran and spending time on learning the traditions of others.