Turkey’s spectacular historical region of Cappadocia, home to the 3916-metre tall Mount Erciyes

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Cappadocia is a very popular historical region in Central Anatolia, Turkey. The provinces which the Cappadocia region covers include Kayseri and Aksaray.

The region contains a very high plateau that reaches to approximately 1000 metres. On the plateau are volcanic peaks, such as the popular Mount Erciyes. This volcano is the tallest among them, stretching to 3916 metres tall.

The rocks that underlie the Cappadocia region originate from sedimentary rocks that formed in lakes and streams, as well as from deposits that erupted in ancient volcanoes. In Goreme, these rocks eroded into hundreds of magnificent pillars and structures. The people who live in central Cappadocian villages had carved houses, churches, and many other buildings from the rocks.

The historical region is world-famous even in the modern day, attracting tourists who seek to view the intriguing cultural sites and natural wonders.

Cappadocia is located to the south-west of the city of Kayseri. Kayseri has an airline as well as a railway operating to many major cities, including Istanbul and the capital city of Turkey – Ankara.

Derinkuyu and Gaziemir are some of the most visited cities in Cappadocia. There are areas there in which historic caves and mansions are popular with tourists, such as in Urgup and Guzelyurt. In the Goreme area of Cappadocia, hot-air balloons are a top attraction for tourists to enjoy and see the incredible sights from far above. Visitors also go trekking in the Ihlara and Monastery valleys.

Cappadocia is also famous for exciting sporting events. There is a track-running marathon that takes place over multiple days, named Runfire Cappadocia Ultramarathon. The marathon was launched in 2012 and is held in July every year. The marathon’s track length measures 244 kilometres and the sporting event lasts a total of six days. Many different parts of Cappadocia are visited on the marathon.

Another successful and major sporting event that took place in Cappadocia was the first ever Turkish Presidential Bike Tour, which was held in 2016. The event was over a five-day period in September. Over 300 cyclists from around the world took part in the bike tour.

The centralised location and high altitude of Cappadocia results in a climate of considerably high temperatures in the summer and very low temperatures in the winter. The general precipitation level of the region is low and it mainly remains dry.

Cappadocia is home to people of many backgrounds, including Turkish, Armenian and Greek.

The ancient borders for the Cappadocia region are not completely clear but according to Herodotus, an ancient Greek historian, the Cappadocians lived in an area that stretched from Mount Taurus to near the Black Sea during the time of the Ionian Revolt. The Ionian Revolt was a major uprising of the Greek cities of Asia Minor against Persian rule. Based on this, the Cappadocia region is described as being outlined by Pontus to the north, Euphrates to the east, the Taurus Mountains to the south, and the Lycaonia and Galatia to the west.